Apple, Autumn Gem, Technology

iPad Meetup

Last night, I attended the The Silicon Valley iPhone and iPad Developers’ Meetup at Bistro 412 in Palo Alto. The venue used to be called Fanny and Alexander (or F&A for short) for as long as I could remember. I photographed several events at F&A, including a Smurfy Brown performance back in 2002. Eight years ago! The iPad and the iPhone were just pie in the sky ideas at that time; look how far we’ve progressed since then!

SVIPHONE Meetup organizer, Tim Burks, ran a great event last night, with tons of demos, giveaways and networking. He had several iPad developers come up to show off their latest creations and was gracious to allow me a few minutes to speak at the end (as I was a late RSVP to the event). I demoed the Autumn Gem application for the iPad that we developed this past weekend at iPadDevCamp. Dom, one of the organizers for iPadDevCamp, also gave a brief shout-out to the crowd that we had won the Future of Publishing award; they accidentally forgot to mention that during the awards ceremony on Sunday, so it was nice to get some recognition of our achievement!

People came up to me after the event finished to say that they thought the app was great; one person even said that out of all the demos, she thought ours was the most impressive. Thanks! We’re getting lots of great feedback and will be releasing the app soon through the App Store.

For those of you interested, we’re having a screening of Autumn Gem (the full-length documentary, not the app) on May 2, at the Saratoga Public Library. Come watch the film, buy a DVD, and talk to the filmmakers! More information can be found at the Autumn Gem screenings page.

Here are some photos from last night’s event:

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Apple, Autumn Gem, Newton, Qiu Jin, Technology

iPad Case and Newton MessagePad Keyboard Case

I’m still collecting my thoughts on the new Apple iPad, but I wanted to share with you a side-by-side comparison shot of the iPad Case and the Newton MessagePad Keyboard Case from 1996. Back when laptops were 6-7 pounds, bringing around a 2-3 pound Newton, external keyboard, and Ricochet wireless modem was perfect for checking email and writing short documents.

MessagePad and iPad cases

While on tour with Autumn Gem, Rae and I having been traveling with two MacBook Pro laptops. It certainly gets heavy lugging around 15 pounds of computers, adapters, and cables around. We’ll still need to bring one MacBook Pro with us on our next tour, but I can see the iPad replacing the other one. With the iPad-VGA adapter, we’ll even be able to run our presentation and film straight from the iPad! While the output is not HD, it’s more than adequate in the venues we’ve been screening Autumn Gem in. The iPad really is a great device for creative professionals who want to showcase their work: photos, videos, illustrations, you name it.

Here’s a photo of me from the Apple Special Event introducing the iPad. More thoughts to come soon!

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Apple, Newton, Technology

SNUG 16th Anniversary Meeting

I got an email today from Sir Izaac reminding me that today was the 16th anniversary meeting of the Stanford Newton User Group. I had completely forgotten about it. Man, has it been that long since the first SNUG meeting and seventeen years since I’ve owned a Newton?!? There are kids today who don’t even know that Apple once had a tablet-sized computer; next week at its Special Event, the company is rumored to be announcing the much anticipated tablet. Whether it’s called the new iBook, iSlate, iTablet, iPod book, or iPad, it’s set to change the game in the burgeoning netbook, e-reader, and portable computing marketplace. I for one have been wondering how people will hold and manipulate a device with a 10-inch screen. Will it come with a handle (see my mockup to the right), or will that void be left for the third-party case manufacturers to fill? I’ve dropped my iPhone a few times without any incident (knock on wood), but I shudder to think what would happen if I dropped the tablet!

iPod book mockup with handle

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iPhoneDevCamp 3 Group Photo

Photography

iPhoneDevCamp 3 Group Photo

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Journal, Photography, Technology

I now have the power to bestow and remove the gift of mobile Internet.

This year, Rae and I anticipate we’ll be traveling a lot as we screen and promote Autumn Gem across the country. Because of this, it will be critical for us to have Internet access wherever we go and whenever we need it.

Mobile Wireless Goodness

Over the past twelve years, I’ve had periods where I had the ability to access the Internet on the run. Initially, it was through the Metricom Ricochet wireless modem. The Ricochet was great because I could hook it up to my PowerBook or Newton and have 56Kbps or 128Kbps access to the Net way back in 1998! Later, I used the Palm VII for quick wireless access from the palm of my hand. The downside to the Palm VII was that you didn’t have full access to the Internet, only access to scaled down Web Clipping applications from select content providers. A few years later, I tried tethering my Sony Ericsson T68i to my laptop, but the speed was very slow. Today, I can use my iPhone to do pretty much all the basic Internet tasks that I require on a daily basis: email and web browsing. If AT&T were to offer a tethering option, I would consider it, but I probably wouldn’t like the slow Edge speeds and the short battery life that would invariably follow.

With that in mind, I’ve been looking for a solution to getting persistent access to the Internet while on the road. From Ziv, I’ve learned of a number of people using the Cradlepoint CTR-350 EVDO/Wi-Fi router ($139) and the Verizon USB727 EVDO modem (free with 2-year service contract). Alex has been using this solution (with Sprint EVDO) successfully since the end of 2007. I picked up these two components along with a BixNet 5V Li-ION battery ($80). This allows me to use share my EVDO Internet connection over Wi-Fi for up to 8 hours on a single battery charge.

So, instead of having my EVDO modem connected only to my laptop, I share the Internet connection through Wi-Fi, meaning my MacBook Pro, iPhone, and iPod touch can access the Internet at the same time at EVDO speeds. As the title of this post suggests, I can also bestow the gift of the Internet to other people.

With an Eye-Fi wireless memory card, I can use this setup to automatically upload photos from my digital camera to my SmugMug account. I wanted to use this at Macworld 2009, but the battery had not come in yet and the keynote room did not have any AC outlets. I ended up manually uploading selected photos to SmugMug for use on John’s live blog posts of the keynote.

I wonder how many photojournalists are using something like this to transmit their photos while on the job. It seems like an excellent way to get photos immediately to the photo editor, provided that the images are small enough. I don’t think I want to try transmitting 21MP images, even if they are JPEG compressed!

Update April 11, 2009: I had a problem with my initial Bixnet battery where the USB cable had to be wiggled in order to provide proper power to the router. I RMA’ed the battery, but I’m not sure if the battery is supplying the router with enough power. At several recent shoots, I’ve noticed that photos were not being uploaded either (1) in a timely fashion or (2) not at all. I’ve got an order in for another battery, the Tekkeon 3450i, which is approved for use with the Cradlepoint CTR-350. The Tekkeon is bigger and heavier than the Bixnet battery, but if it’s more reliable, it’s a better deal. I’d rather have something that works and is heavier than something that only works intermittently. I’ll provide an update when I have tested the Tekkeon. Stay tuned!

Update April 19, 2009 The new BixNet battery does not appear to supply enough current to continually power the Cradlepoint and USB EVDO modem. The connection comes and goes, making the combination useless. BixNet has been selling an “updated” version of the battery, one with a mini-USB port for charging the battery. This version does not come with an on-off switch.

On the other hand, the Tekkeon 3450i battery seems to work well. It’s much bigger, heavier, and pricier than the BixNet. I’ve updated the photos to show a side-by-side comparison of the two batteries. Another downside to the Tekkeon is that it has a huge AC adapter for charging the battery. I really like how the BixNet can be charged with virtually any USB AC adapter like my iPhone charger.

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Apple, Palm, Technology

What Is Palm Nova?

Tomorrow is being touted as Palm’s make-or-break moment. It’s poised to announce Nova, the company’s next operating system.

Despite being a former employee and knowing several people still at the company, I honestly no nothing about what Nova is or isn’t (that’s a good thing they haven’t been talking – secrecy in this case is good). I’ve been very down on Palm in the past and am still hesitant to think that they can rise from the ashes to relevance in light of competition from Apple and RIM. That said, I’ve been thinking about what Nova could be, and I want to throw my guess before the cat is out of the bag tomorrow.

Nova will be a new operating system that uses applications made with standard web development tools to access information on the device and from the Internet.

Software developers aren’t going to want to develop for yet another phone; they are busy making apps for iPhone and Blackberry. But, what if Nova software development isn’t aimed at traditional software developers but at traditional web developers? If developers could make native phone applications using Javascript, PHP, Ruby, Python, they might very interested in Nova.

I used to work at a company called DoDots, which made widgets (mini-browsers and micro-web content) years before Konfabulator, Dashboard Widgets, and Google Widgets became fashionable. Before that, I worked with Palm on the Palm VII, which used Web Clippings to break down web content into more manageable pieces for use on a handheld screen. What if Palm’s Nova is an operating system whose applications are written like standard web applications today? They could run on the device in disconnected mode, accessing information stored on the device in a MySQL or SQLite database, or access information on the web using the same techniques? A developer writing an application for the web could have an app that could conceivably also run on a Nova-powered phone.

Is this the fat middle of the market that Palm is saying they are targeting with their new OS and handheld device?

We’ll find out tomorrow!

Update January 8, 2008: webOS platform prediction was right!

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