Hanging out on Saturday Afternoon

I met up with Dardy, Rita, Amabelle, Steven, Bill, and John at Lucy’s Teahouse over in Mountain View this morning at 11:30 am. We spent the next few hours just hanging out and playing games over peach tea and the pork special. Lucy’s Teahouse feels just like home, remarked John, as he, Rita, and I played Chinese Checkers. This was the first time that I played that game, but it was pretty quick to learn. Go, on the other hand, is a more challenging game; I’ve heard that it’s more challenging and thought-intensive than chess. Suffice it to say, I did better in Chinese Checkers than I did in Go.

As is customary among us, we took a lot of pictures. I’m glad that we’re a group of people who both don’t mind taking a lot of pictures and being in a lot of pictures. Sure, there are a few of us who shy away from the camera, but when they’re not looking, they make for great face. I brought along the 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5, and I quickly realized why I like my L-series lenses. They’re fast! In indoor lighting conditions, the speed of the lens, coupled with the sensitivity of the film/sensor can mean the difference between a blurry shot and a tack sharp shot.

After a few hours at Lucy’s we went back to Adam’s Teahouse (i.e. my place) for more photos and conversation. I learned that Bill used to work at Apple Computer in the Newton group! He was surprised to see a couple of Newtons lying around my desk. I demoed them the power of this little green marvel, such as its excellent handwriting recognition and its ability to be a web server. During our conversation, I heard beeps and sounds from the Newton that meant only one thing: someone was accessing my Newton web server! Cool deal!

We played around with my camera’s settings, testing off-camera flash and various lenses. I took off the 24-85mm and switched between the 17-35mm f/2.8L and the 28-70mm f/2.8L at the house. Those are some sharp lenses!

The picture that’s at the beginning of this page reminded us of a family portrait. Why there’s cousin Adam and look! There’s Auntie Amabelle! Who’s that? Oh, that’s Bill, our long-lost cousin from America. Classic!

I wrote in my earlier photojournal from July 6, 2001 that I should hold more little get togethers at my place. It was fun having some new people at my place, see them relax in my little pad (no, no more comments on my Shag Pad, John!). For a little more variety in my place… and to make it seem a little more busy, I should do this more often!

On a related note, everyone. I used Cameraid, Adobe Photoshop’s Batch Actions, and AppleScript to automate the creation of this web page. Unlike my photojournal for the July 4th BBQ, this web page was a snap to create, clocking in at under an hour!

Third-party photographers

I don’t mind having other people take pictures with my camera. It’s fun to teach them how to use such a beast of a photographic machine. I figure if they hang out with me long enough, they’ll learn a few tricks that they’ll be able to apply with their own cameras. Point and shoots, if handled correctly, can be just as creative as the most expensive SLR, digital or film-based. It’s not the equipment that counts, it’s the person behind the lens who is the most important component.

That being said, Rita’s got a good eye for photography; she could do some major damage with the D30 if she ever got one for herself, that’s for sure!

Update: July 17, 2001

I was talking with Oliver over email and he told me that the original Lucy sold the Teahouse a few years back. So, while the name is still Lucy’s Teahouse, Lucy’s not there anymore!

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